Archive for February, 2016

Escaping the Mount

February 25, 2016

Here is a short video with Flavio Meier showing some options of escaping the mount.

These are some of my favorite moves, basic yet effective in getting you out from the mount and into a better position. Like all jiu jitsu techniques you will need to drill these escapes cooperatively at first, then with some resistance/positional sparring, then give it a go during live training and see if you can pull it off. Give it  a try and let me know what you think.

You can learn more about Flavio Meier here:

http://www.kravmagainstitute.com/inst…

Flavio now runs his own Brazilian Jiu Jitsu academy in Santa Clara, CA at the Krav Maga Institute headquarters. He also holds a Krav Maga Instructor Certification through Krav Maga Institute. In addition to teaching full-time, Flavio has been an very active competitor, winning every major tournament, and coaching many athletes to the top of the podium in every major BJJ tournament.

Notable Titles:

2x IBJJF World Jiu-Jitsu NoGi Champion (2015, 2014)
2x Pan American Jiu-Jitsu Champion (2015, 2011)
SJJIF World Jiu-Jitsu Gi Champion (2014)
US Open Champion (2014 x2, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010)
Houston International Open IBJJF Champion (2011)
American Nationals Champion (2010)
Miami International Open IBJJF Champion (2010)
IBJJF World Jiu-Jitsu NoGi (2012 Bronze, 2011 Bronze, 2010 Bronze)
Pan American Jiu-Jitsu NoGi (2011 Bronze, 2010 Silver, 2010 Bronze Open Weight)
San Francisco Open (2015 Bronze, 2014 Silver, 2014 Bronze Open Weight)
SJJIF World Jiu-Jitsu NoGi (2014 Silver)
IBJJF International Master (2010 Bronze)

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SAucY!

February 18, 2016

There are many styles of guard passing; tight guard passes where you are using pressure to make your opponent concede the pass. Speed passes where you use your agility to confuse or get ahead of your opponent to get the pass, or a combination of the two together.  Trying to find your own flavor of guard passing can be difficult. Many circumstances come into play such as your training environment (instructor’s philosophy, teammates (how they like to pass and influence), your physical attributes, and even temperament come into play just to name a few.  I believe that finding a style of your own takes time and experimentation. Being only a blue belt only myself I find that I am barley starting to establish a resemblance of having my own distinct flavor. So how do you find what works for you?

First I believe you need to have a basic catalog of passes in your arsenal. Bread and butter techniques consisting of fundamental passing techniques crucial to understand how different style passes work. Techniques that are universally taught wherever you learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. These techniques I believe that are important are a mixture of speed and pressure passing techniques. Pressure passes including; double under and single under. Speed passes such as torreando and the knee slice pass. It is important that you learn these techniques from your instructor and get them technically sound. They will help give you reference point to learn new passing techniques and strategies. After learning these techniques individually you can also learn to chain these movements together.

After mastering your basic passes you can start to develop an approach on how to attack passing the guard. Learning from and watching your higher belt teammates and asking questions as to why they will use so and so grip when or how they pass will also be a big influence. Other external forces that come into play might be the types of guards you come across in your training environment. Is your gym heavily influenced by the modern game with open guard players who like to invert and intertwine their legs in-between yours? Or is your academy mostly old school playing heavily closed guard games and feet on the hips and biceps with collar and sleeve grips? Try to expose yourself to as many different body types and games and experiment. Get a feel of your own body, balance, and posture so that when you can have as much familiarity as you can with all types of positions.

Last I think your style of guard passing will be dependent on your attributes and temperament (internal factors). Some people like to play the methodical game, some people are explosive and like to use speed and percistance to their advantage. You might even have a favorite BJJ athlete you follow and try to emulate. No matter what style it is that you play always remember to master the basics first. Once you have mastered the fundamentals you can easily start applying these principal movements into your own personal style and start developing a game that is uniquely your own.

Here is a favorite movements of passes I like to drill from MG in Action’s Henrique Rezende. You can find many vidoes like this one and more on their site at  www.mginaction.com

“When one has reached maturity in the art, one will have a formless form. It is like ice dissolving in water. When one has no form, one can be all forms; when one has no style, he can fit in with any style.” -Bruce Lee