Posts Tagged ‘guard passing’

SAucY!

February 18, 2016

There are many styles of guard passing; tight guard passes where you are using pressure to make your opponent concede the pass. Speed passes where you use your agility to confuse or get ahead of your opponent to get the pass, or a combination of the two together.  Trying to find your own flavor of guard passing can be difficult. Many circumstances come into play such as your training environment (instructor’s philosophy, teammates (how they like to pass and influence), your physical attributes, and even temperament come into play just to name a few.  I believe that finding a style of your own takes time and experimentation. Being only a blue belt only myself I find that I am barley starting to establish a resemblance of having my own distinct flavor. So how do you find what works for you?

First I believe you need to have a basic catalog of passes in your arsenal. Bread and butter techniques consisting of fundamental passing techniques crucial to understand how different style passes work. Techniques that are universally taught wherever you learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. These techniques I believe that are important are a mixture of speed and pressure passing techniques. Pressure passes including; double under and single under. Speed passes such as torreando and the knee slice pass. It is important that you learn these techniques from your instructor and get them technically sound. They will help give you reference point to learn new passing techniques and strategies. After learning these techniques individually you can also learn to chain these movements together.

After mastering your basic passes you can start to develop an approach on how to attack passing the guard. Learning from and watching your higher belt teammates and asking questions as to why they will use so and so grip when or how they pass will also be a big influence. Other external forces that come into play might be the types of guards you come across in your training environment. Is your gym heavily influenced by the modern game with open guard players who like to invert and intertwine their legs in-between yours? Or is your academy mostly old school playing heavily closed guard games and feet on the hips and biceps with collar and sleeve grips? Try to expose yourself to as many different body types and games and experiment. Get a feel of your own body, balance, and posture so that when you can have as much familiarity as you can with all types of positions.

Last I think your style of guard passing will be dependent on your attributes and temperament (internal factors). Some people like to play the methodical game, some people are explosive and like to use speed and percistance to their advantage. You might even have a favorite BJJ athlete you follow and try to emulate. No matter what style it is that you play always remember to master the basics first. Once you have mastered the fundamentals you can easily start applying these principal movements into your own personal style and start developing a game that is uniquely your own.

Here is a favorite movements of passes I like to drill from MG in Action’s Henrique Rezende. You can find many vidoes like this one and more on their site at  www.mginaction.com

“When one has reached maturity in the art, one will have a formless form. It is like ice dissolving in water. When one has no form, one can be all forms; when one has no style, he can fit in with any style.” -Bruce Lee

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BJJ Today!

July 16, 2015

The art of learningjiu how to learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is just as much of an art as how to teach Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Being that it is 2015 and with the advancement of communication via social networks and having learning tools available to us has deeply influences this present, my present generation of jiujiteros, advancing the of sharing information, speeding up the learning curve. Thus allowing current practitioners to acquire skills much more rapid pace than ever before. Why is it so many practitioners have to go else where for more additional resources? Why are most schools continuing to teach in such a similar cookie cutter fashion as their teachers had in the past and their teachers before them?

The fact that Jiu Jitsu’s popularity is greater now at this time then ever before I believe that it is critical moment. Our martial art can either grow stronger and we become more united or we can continue to grow and for the sake of growth let our martial art become watered down. It is up to those coming up the ranks now to uphold the standards and to keep it from becoming watered down. We must strive to not only for growth in numbers but in growth in learning how to teach leverage the tools available to us to create pass down something greater than giving to us now.

With all that said what are some different ways or modes, formats of teaching have you seen in BJJ? What can we  do to make it better?

Guard Passing 2

July 15, 2013

Guard Passing 2

Continuing on with my last guard passing post I just want to reiterate again that there are so many different guard passes how does one keep from being overwhelmed? Whenever I personally feel like something is too much for me I like to go back to the age old wise acronym I learned in 8th grade while playing basketball. K.I.S.S. keep it simple stupid! To me there really is no good or bad passes. Every pass can be used at a specific time and place and there is a reason for everything good and bad. For example when I do my toreando pass should I grab at the knees or closer near the ankles. When approaching an open pass should I step inside the middle using an A frame to cut through or begin by
reaching for the pant legs or I can initiate a toreanda? Whether you like pressure or speed, passing on your knees or standing up, you should get familiar with a couple of basic passes, mix them up , and find which ones work for you best. Passes I believe everybody should be familiar and I consider fundamental would be:
torreando, knee slide pass, double under pass. Majority of the other passes will be variations of these three main passes often used and combined together, mixed and
matched with all kinds of grip variotions etc.

For myself I am light and lanky and like to use my personal attributes when passing such as the ability to maintain distance due to my long limbs, and my speed. Therefore I use a lot of toreando passing often moving from one side to the other trying to tire my opponent or keep him flat on his back. I often try to use Leandro Lo’s variation of the pass, I feel it is quick and an aggressive style thigh fits my body type. I am still learning the nuances of the pass and my options; being a white belt I still have a lot to learn and more rolling to do. So enough banter lets see the man himself in action!

 

Guard Passing

July 8, 2013

The curious case of Samson Hayilu! How come my blog is all over the place? How come now I am  writing about so many different martial arts? Ok I admit it I am  a martial arts whore, I love it all from the traditional to the contemporary styles, even MMA. Mostly my evolution as a martial artist has lead me to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, my new girl friend!  So I am just going to be using this blog to get stuff on my mind, to think, and try to understand whatever it is I am thinking I am studying. Don’t take my writing as dogma; my thoughts, my ideas are always changing from one day to another. In addition I am just a white belt so I just might be flat out just wrong…it happens but yea. So  here we go.

Lately I have been focusing on my guard passing. Watching a lot of people  at my gym, online, on instructional etc I have came to the conclusion that there is just way to many freaking guard passes. Even looking at the basic various guard passes such as toreando or cut through passes it seems that everybody has their own variation on how to do it. What I have been trying to do is understand why they are doing what they are doing. Why person x has one grip and person why has another for the same pass. The underlying principles of what is happening, what I am trying to accomplish and my opponent trying to defend.

One of the conclusions I have came to is trying to chain certain passes together and maintaining the same grip for those chained passes. I feel that in doing this it allows me to stay one step ahead of the guarder, giving me the allusion that I am actually faster than I really am by knowing his possible reactions and already having a game plane based on his reactions. Here are  a couple of videos that show this in action.

http://www.graciemag.com/2013/07/gui-mendes-breaks-down-a-grip-that-makes-a-knee-slice-long-step-leg-drag-possible/